Support for the Archaeological Expedition to Vani.

Research Grant to Dr Nino Kavtaria.

26th International Congress of Byzantine Studies

FaRiG was delighted to offer its sponsorship and backing to seven Georgian scholars who came to London in August for the International Congress of Byzantine Studies. This is a prestigious five-yearly gathering in which around 1,000 experts on all aspects of Byzantine civilisation come together to present papers and exchange ideas.

Here is some information about the scholars they sponsored, and the topics on which they were hoping to speak at the London conference.

Nino Kavtaria

Nino Kavtaria

Nino Kavtaria looks after the Art History and Theory section of the Department of History at Tbilisi State University. She has been studying the miniature paintings in some superbly illuminated manuscripts that were produced in the 11th century by a Georgian scriptorium, at Kalipos monastery on the Black Mountain near Antioch/Antakya in the south of present-day Turkey. In her paper, she will be focusing on the Alaverdi Gospel, one of the greatest products of that scriptorium. She will compare and contrast the Black Mountain manuscripts with other illuminated texts from the Greek and Georgian worlds from the same period.

Available as PDFs: CV & Research Synopsis

Giorgi Tcheishvili

Giorgi Tcheishvili

Giorgi Tcheishvili is a senior researcher at the Insitute of History and Ethnography of the Georgian Academy of Science. He is an editor of the Historical Atlas of Georgia (Tbilisi, 2003) and of its forthcoming English edition. He is also the author of 13 academic articles, and has received a research award from the British Academy. In his paper, he will be looking at church organisation in southwestern part of the medieval Georgian kingdom during the 9th and 10th centuries. He will explain the dynastic, geopolitical and theological factors which led to the establishment of five new dioceses in the territory of the Bagratid kings.

Available as PDFs: CV & Research Synopsis

Victoria Jugeli

Victoria Jugeli

Victoria Jugeli is a lecturer at the Institute of Classical Philology, Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies at Tbilisi State University. In her paper, she will be looking at a 'Catena Bible' - in other words, a text of the Bible accompanied by a 'chain' of related commentaries from the early Church fathers - from Gelati, the great Georgian monastery and centre of learning founded in 1106. She will be comparing the commentaries in Georgian with the Greek editions (such as the works of Monk Nicephoros Theotokis) of manuscripts to find its Greek sources.

Irina Giviashvili

Irina Giviashvili

Irina Giviashvili lectures in medieval architecture at the Faculty of Art History and Restoration of the Tbilisi State Academy of Art. She has a special interest in the churches of the Tao-Klarjeti region, now part of northeastern Turkey, which was one the greatest centres of Georgian culture and spirituality in the 9th and 10th centuries. At one point this region was home to 12 important monasteries, and it was described as the 'Georgian Sinai'. Dr Giviashvili has looked in particular at the mysterious Zegani church, a 10th century structure which was discovered in 1902 and is not mentioned in any medieval document. In recent years she and her co-worker Irakli Koplatadze have presented the fruits of their research at international conferences in Budapest and Oxford. She is looking forward to taking part, along with Turkish, Georgian and other European scholars, in a special session of the Byzantine Congress in London which will be devoted to the Tao-Klarjeti region and its heritage. Among the concerns she will raise is the risk of ancient churches being threatened by plans to build a dam in the area.

Available as a PDF: CV

Ketevan Bezarashvili

Ketevan Bezarashvili

As a philologist and church historian, Maia Matchavariani is another specialist on Georgian versions of the works of St Gregory of Nazianzus. She has written 15 academic articles in this subject area and presented three papers to international conferences. In her presentation to the London congress, she will looking in particular at a work ascribed to St Gregory in praise of St Demetrios, one of the most popular holy figures in the eastern Christian world. This text has survived in Georgian but there is no obvious Greek original. What Dr Matchavariani will demonstrate that the Georgian text is closely based on a Greek document that does exist, a work by St Gregory in praise of St Cyprian, with some stories from the life of St Demetrios added in. This is an intriguing piece of scholarly detective work with broader implications for the study of patristic texts.

Available as PDFs: CV & Research Synopsis

Maia Matchavariani

Maia Matchavariani

As a philologist and church historian, Maia Matchavariani is another specialist on Georgian versions of the works of St Gregory of Nazianzus. She has written 15 academic articles in this subject area and presented three papers to international conferences. In her presentation to the London congress, she will looking in particular at a work ascribed to St Gregory in praise of St Demetrios, one of the most popular holy figures in the eastern Christian world. This text has survived in Georgian but there is no obvious Greek original. What Dr Matchavariani will demonstrate that the Georgian text is closely based on a Greek document that does exist, a work by St Gregory in praise of St Cyprian, with some stories from the life of St Demetrios added in. This is an intriguing piece of scholarly detective work with broader implications for the study of patristic texts.

Available as PDFs: CV